8 Telugu Songs For The Moods And Musings Of The Lockdown
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If we can turn the clock back and relive 2019, we’d all do it in a jiffy. But our clocks don’t have hands now since we’re living behind closed doors. Although there’ll be plenty of songs — and movies — that will address the issues of grief, despair, and several other emotions in the coming years, we will have to wait for the vicious waves to pass. Until we find that rainbow in the sky, we need to mask up and maintain Covid-appropriate behavior in public spaces. 

For now, we can sit back and enjoy these Telugu film songs. 

Doragari — Brochevarevarura (2019)

Do you remember the days when you used to bunk classes and go to a theatre? Ah, that was the golden age, right? You could even whistle without having to think twice about the repercussions. As much as Vivek Sagar mesmerizes you with his lilting tune, you have to give some credit to the actors (Sree Vishnu, Priyadarshi, Rahul Ramakrishna, and Nivetha Thomas), for they make ‘Doragari’ appear so much more beautiful. More than anything else, this is a song about a ship that never sinks — friendship. 

 

Chitti — Jathi Ratnalu (2021)

Isn’t finding the right emoji while texting your crush a tough task? You want to sound confident and not pompous. You want to show that you’re investing your time and energy into discovering the other person’s interests and wishes, and, at the same time, you don’t want to jump the gun, either. So, take some lessons from ‘Chitti‘. It gives you a simple road map that teaches you how to make fun of yourself without making it look like a staged event. 

Yamaha Nagari — Choodalani Vundi (1998)

Are you stuck in a city whose language you don’t speak? Are you trying all the tricks in the book to communicate your thoughts freely? Isn’t ‘Yamaha Nagari’ the balm you need right now? Whether it’s Hariharan’s mellifluous voice, or Veturi’s gorgeous lyrics, you just can’t help falling in love with the song. And then there’s Chiranjeevi who dances like there’s no tomorrow. What more do you want? Please, don’t say avakaya!

Idhem Life Ra — Mithai (2019)

Working from home may not be everybody’s cup of tea. While it’s totally enjoyable to slip into pajamas and breathe a sigh of relief every now and then, the new normal has blurred the lines between office-time and me-time. ‘Idhem Life Ra is a throwback to the era in which routines were termed overrated. In reality, though, we need something between “Idhem Life Ra” and “Aha, Life Ante Idhi Ra”. 

Preyasi Kavu — Vennela (2005)

If there’s anything that rhymes with MS, it’s the US for Telugus. Even if it’s not the first choice for young students, they’re forced to move to the West to pursue master’s degrees. This kind of unnecessary pressure stems from their parents and peers. And therein lies the challenge of finding the right bunch of buddies to chill with, and, by extension, the right person to date. Do you, as an NRI, see yourself in Vennela?

Veedukole Vedikaina — Happy Days (2007)

When it comes to college life, farewell parties are very important. But it almost seems like a dream to throw a party today and it’s clearly not advisable. If you’ve spent the last year or two in front of a screen and haven’t had the chance to bid goodbye to your classmates and teachers, here’s a song for you. Of course, ‘Veedukole Vedikaina’ cannot be the closure you might be seeking, but it surely comes close to evoking a similar feeling. 

O Cheli Thaara — Sammohanam (2018)

How do you cope with the unpredictable nature of long-distance relationships? It’s certainly easy to keep in touch with your partner given the number of apps we have now. You can make video calls and even pay a couple of surprise visits. But in the current situation, your heart may be bleating like a lonely hunter. Therefore, a dose of ‘O Cheli Thaara’ is recommended. 

Asha Pasham — C/o Kancharapalem (2018)

We, as humans, are wired to think that only the weaklings surrender to the cries of failure. We keep running after many things and, oftentimes, forget what it means to take a step back and evaluate the weight of our goals. As Anurag Kulkarni tells us, “Repetavuno thelaalantey, nuvvedhuru soodali gaa,” we need to keep in mind that it’s necessary to crack a window open in order to let the breeze of optimism in. 

 

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